My video works attempt to denaturalize the social construct of domesticity, the private and the male gaze by expending sounds, movements, and imagery of the pleasure device. The videos, an extension of my study of Duchamp’s Noise Box experiments, address issues of spectatorship, self and identity, highlighting domestic spaces as private domains of female subjectivity. The physical body is absent in these videos, but the eroticism is suggested by the inclusion of vibrators, their sounds and movements. The videos are voyeuristic and pornographic as they aid “the publication of that which is private” (Preciado 266 -267) but negate other tropes such as, sex as performance (Preciado 268), in its literal sense. The videos rupture the signifier of female sexuality with the absence of the female body, which historically is defined to be sexual and objectified for the male gaze. The videos aim to subvert the male gaze through a still, passive, almost sterile and ambiguous set up that denies the logic of pornography – a feminine eroticized technological apparatus, lacking an embodied image (Preciado 265).

Moving Still Life (O HER! Series 1.1)

Digital video, 2018, 2.44 mins, 16:9 aspect ratio, 1920 x 1080 Full HDR

This work involves everyday objects of domestic use, destabilizing the idea of female domestication as a normative social practice. The objects (domestic vessels) connote bodies that hide these tiny pleasure bullets, staged as a conventional still life set up with a single point light. It is also a commentary on painting as a historically male-dominated activity. “The default position of images is feminine (Mitchell)”, as stated by J. W. T. Mitchell. In the video, the passive, immobile and still, the feminine default position is activated for the male gaze, but without the presence of a physical body.

The Little Death (O HER! Series 1.2)

Digital video, 2018, 4.24 mins, 16:9 aspect ratio, 1920 x 1080 Full HDR

In this video, I attempt to liken the vanitas concept of still life paintings to the death-like feeling experienced while having an orgasm. The video is shot in the conventional Dutch vanitas style with symbolism in the objects composed in the frame. The frame is eroticized with the hidden vibrators that do their own erratic dance. The movements in a serious set up like this which depicts temporality and the fleeting nature of all worldly desires make for a comical viewing. The staged bubbles floating in the space add to the comic drama of the still frame. The vibrators with feathers inside the birdcage, wrapped under pearl necklaces and shaped in the form of lipsticks provide varied sounds that elude the viewer from attaching a set narrative and in fact, give the spectator space to wander freely and think critically.

In Her Bedroom (O HER! Series 2.1)

Digital video, 2018, 2.46 mins, 16:9 aspect ratio, 1920 x 1080 Full HDR

This video depicts a private domestic space, interspersed with the same household objects that contain the vibrators, imparting random sounds that lure the viewer to seek the objects. The tension develops as the viewer attempts to decipher the space, interrupted by the sudden movements of the objects that unexpectedly break the stillness, calling for attention and an inquiry into the reproduction of that which is personal, erotic yet a bit ambiguous in this case. There is an absence of the physical body in the videos, but the eroticism is suggested by the inclusion of vibrators, their sounds and movements. The videos are voyeuristic and pornographic as they aid “the publication of that which is private” (Preciado 266 -267) but negate other tropes such as, sex as performance (Preciado 268), in its literal sense. The videos aim to subvert the male gaze through a still, passive, almost sterile and ambiguous set up that denies the logic of pornography – a feminine eroticized technological apparatus but lacking an embodied image (Preciado 265).

The Rabbit in Her Kitchen (O HER! Series 2.2)

Digital video, 2018, 3.52 mins, 16:9 aspect ratio, 1920 x 1080 Full HDR

My videos are a bit strange. They posit a kitchen but then there is a rabbit on the kitchen counter and suddenly the whole film is (Pocius)noisy, and the viewer is left wondering what is producing this noise which might sound familiar yet remains unfamiliar. The rabbit symbolically stands for physical love – unbridled sexuality and lust. It is also a symbol of fertility, prolific breeding, vitality and sexual desires. In recent contexts, the Playboy bunny was known to have ‘humorous sexual connotations’, ‘frisky and playful’. And to add to these symbolisms, the rabbit vibrator – a specifically designed vibrator is known to provide both clitoral and penetrative pleasure. These symbolisms of the rabbit inspired me to place the animal in an unassuming domestic space of the kitchen. The rabbit adds to the humor but the long take, detached framing and lack of control of the viewer’s gaze gives the viewer the freedom to interpret and make their own connections.